Do you support text to 911 by sms

  • 1
  • Question
  • Updated 4 years ago
  • Answered
http://www.fcc.gov/text-to-911
The nation’s Tier 1 carriers have committed to fully implementing text-to-9-1-1 services. Are you prepared to offer this lifesaving service to your subscribers? 
Photo of Huang Bill

Huang Bill

  • 5 Posts
  • 0 Reply Likes

Posted 4 years ago

  • 1
Photo of Bob Heckmann

Bob Heckmann, Official Rep

  • 349 Posts
  • 12 Reply Likes
Hi Bill,

Thanks for the question. Today, a SIM used in an M2M / IoT device must be voice-enabled in order for it to make a 911 emergency services call (the 911 emergency service does not currently accept SMS). Additionally, the SIM would have to be in a handset, operated by a person, for the call to go through. 

Do you have a specific use case in mind for which SMS from a machine to 911 would be required?

 

Regards,

The Aeris team

Photo of Huang Bill

Huang Bill

  • 5 Posts
  • 0 Reply Likes
Hi Bob,

Thanks for your reply. We are required to have a emergency text-to-911 functionality on our handhold smart sensor, since it is a text based connected tool.  I noticed that T-mobile has provided the service of text-to-911. So my question is can we get through based on your network infrastructure?

according to the FCC website:
to-911 for all Americans “as quickly as possible” 
Washington, D.C. – FCC Chairman Julius Genachowski announced today that the nation’s four largest wireless carriers – AT&T, Verizon, Sprint, T-Mobile – have agreed to accelerate the availability of text-to-911, with major deployments expected in 2013 and a commitment to nationwide availability by May 15, 2014. Building on text-to-911 deployments and trials that are already underway, this agreement will accelerate progress and ensure that over 90 percent of the nation’s wireless consumers, including millions of consumers with hearing or speech disabilities, will be able to access emergency services by sending a text message to 911, where local 911 call centers (known as a Public Safety Answering Points, or PSAPs) are also prepared to receive the texts. 

the FCC will consider steps towards ensuring that text-to-911 is made available as soon as possible by all carriers, and over-the-top providers who offer Internet-based text services.

Chairman Genachowski said, “Access to 911 must catch up with how consumers 
communicate in the 21st century – and today, we are one step closer towards that vital goal. Last year I announced a comprehensive plan to accelerate the transition to Next Generation 911, including text-to-911, and the FCC has acted to advance this effort.



 
Photo of Bob Heckmann

Bob Heckmann, Official Rep

  • 349 Posts
  • 12 Reply Likes
Hi Bill,

Thanks for the question. The response below is a bit detailed but it's the only way to clearly explain the issue. Note that if we learn anything that is inconsistent with this we'll post an update.

Regards,
Bob


The FCC text-to-911 website says the following:

“The Commission’s text-to-911 rules do not apply to text messaging applications that do not support texting to and from U.S. phone numbers. Thus, text messaging apps that only support texting with other app users or texting via social media are not required to support text-to-911.”

Our preliminary view is that the text-to-911 rules do not apply to a device powered by an Aeris SIM on the GSM network that is capable of communication with another machine via an SMS message. These devices do NOT contain dialable U.S. phone numbers, only other numbers that enable a carrier to route messages to and from the device. The purpose of the text-to-911 rules is to enable a consumer to initiate a contact by SMS message with the public safety answering point (PSAP) administering the 911 system with the expectation that the PSAP could call the consumer back (or text back) at the same device to learn more about the emergency situation. A text message sent to 911 from a device with an Aeris SIM could not receive a call or text back from the PSAP.